How far can we go with technology and Religion? #TweetingInTongues

Some of the most sensitized topics that we constantly have to tip toe around include Sex, race and RELIGION. So how do we make it work for us in a social space?

Last year, the sensational, South African singer and actress Kelly Khumalo tweeted praying in tongues, and unapologetically justified her actions. This occurred after a media frenzy, caused by news of her handing herself in at the Hillbrow police station emerged, for allegedly assaulting a soccer player’s wife.
https://twitter.com/Kelly_Khumalo/status/304977847632658433

Online praying is generally formed for discussions, meditating and reflecting on faith-related issues, and also to connect people with pastors and prayer groups from anywhere in the world.

Praying in tongues on the other hand is known as a secret code or language of “angels” between an individual and God, with the purpose of channelling your divinity and strength through prayer – also known as a power prayer.

 

Source: Kelly Khumalo's tweet (@Kelly_Khumalo)
Source: Kelly Khumalo’s tweet (@Kelly_Khumalo)

 

Human experiences often cause a deeper interaction with your spiritual being. Could this action of “tweeting in tongues” to Kelly’s 80000+ followers on twitter be justifiable, because she was supposedly in the “spirit”?

Furthermore, after any kind of moving experience social media has become a platform of relief or expression where messages of grievance or jubilance are shared in a social space as form as therapy.

So who are we to Judge Kelly Khumalo? Do we even have a right to be angry?

 

 

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