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by Denise Johnson

The outsider’s stairway to good decisions

Here’s a completely hypothetical character. One that has just completed their tertiary education and is equipped with, what I will concede to be, all the skills needed to begin their professional life…along with good dose of courage and confidence.

Historically, our hypothetical character has not been notably good at making life decisions. We may call him an outsider to decision making. But now a particular set of decisions are about to introduce themselves to them. The decisions that will make them or break them. And they know this.

The results of bad decision making have been felt, at varying scales, by all the souls that live, have lived or will live. They can range from being, truly and completely, negligible straight on to being fatal. However, we are not always aware of the decision points or, even, of the decisions themselves. But when we are aware of the decisions and the points in which they are to be made, we are obliged to make the best decision we can possibly make

I would say that it is very important for them to know what they want. I might even say it’s the first step they should take towards the decision. Being familiar with what it is they love and what it is they hate, or their strengths and weaknesses, they might find this part quite simple. There will, however, be a variety of paths that lead to their goals. Each significantly different from the other…thus the decision

This is when I would suggest that they consider what they know and what they don’t. This should be followed up by research which will serve to validate what they already know and teach them what they don’t know. Information is very crucial in decision making and it may be considered irresponsible to make a decision without going considering what you know alongside what you do know.

After goals are made and research is done, the decision is made. They would be on a path of their own choosing. One that hopefully offers them the greatest opportunity with the highest possible convenience. But what if it’s not? What would be the consequences if the decision they’ve made turns out horribly? It is also very important to consider that. People have found themselves unable to recover from the bad decisions that they had made.

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